• Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

A suit for the dissolution of a marriage in Texas must be on file at least 60 days before the final judgment is entered. A suit for the dissolution of a marriage in Texas must be on file at least 60 days before the final judgment is entered. A suit…

  • Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

At least one party to the suit must have lived in the state for at least six months and in the county in which the suit is being filed for 90 days prior to filing. At least one party to the suit must have lived in the state for at…

  • Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

The State of Texas has issued statutory guidelines regarding the amount of money a party may be ordered to pay to support a child. The guidelines are based upon your monthly income and the number of children before the court. The guidelines also take into account a party’s legal obligation…

  • Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

Texas law does not require a parent to support his or her child beyond the age of 18 or graduation from high school, whichever occurs later. While parties may contractually agree that one party will pay for a child’s college tuition, the court is not authorized to order a party…

  • Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

Collaborative law is a relatively new way of handling divorce suits that came about in the early 90’s. The concept of collaborative law is focused on parties cooperating with one another and amicably reaching a resolution of all aspects of their divorce without judicial intervention. While each party retains his…

  • Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

While Texas law does not recognize alimony per se, the law in Texas does authorize courts to award what is referred to as “spousal maintenance” in certain circumstances. Spousal maintenance is essentially support paid by one spouse to the dependent spouse that continues after the marriage has been dissolved. Spousal…

  • Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

There are several different mediation styles and, in some instances, mediators do hold what is referred to as a “joint caucus session” where all parties are in the same room. However, this style of mediation is not typically used in family law matters. The more common practice in family law…

  • Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

While mediation is not required in all instances, many courts mandate that parties attend mediation prior to having a hearing or trial of their suit.

  • Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

Mediation is an informal and confidential way for people to resolve their disputes. A form of alternative dispute resolution, mediation is a process wherein individuals meet with a neutral third party referred to as the “mediator”. The mediator, who is generally a family law attorney, is trained to assist parties…