Getting all the details right the first time In our digital age, almost every task can be completed online. As technology continues to improve and make certain projects more convenient online the frustration and somewhat unknown details of the legal process still remain. However, doing this on your own isn’t…

Is a Free consultation from a divorce lawyer, too good to be true? If you and your spouse are considering divorce in Houston, TX it is strongly recommended that you seek guidance from an experienced attorney. Many people search for a divorce lawyer who offers a free consultation. Additionally, free…

Child custody and support with unmarried parents Regardless of whether a couple is married when they split up and a child is involved the most important thing is that child’s wellbeing. However, being unwed can have its complications when it comes to child custody and support in Texas. The family…

  • Oct 24, 2018
  • FAQ

Alimony in Texas Alimony, otherwise known as spousal maintenance in Texas, refers to a payment made by one spouse to the other following a divorce to help pay for basic needs. In Texas, a spouse may qualify for spousal maintenance if certain criteria are met, but it is important to…

Insider Tips for Hiring the Right Divorce Attorney If you are facing a divorce from your spouse you already know that there’s a lot to think about: Who will retain custody of your children? How will your children will receive financial support? How will marital assets such as property and…

  • Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

A suit for the dissolution of a marriage in Texas must be on file at least 60 days before the final judgment is entered. A suit for the dissolution of a marriage in Texas must be on file at least 60 days before the final judgment is entered. A suit…

  • Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

At least one party to the suit must have lived in the state for at least six months and in the county in which the suit is being filed for 90 days prior to filing. At least one party to the suit must have lived in the state for at…

  • Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

The State of Texas has issued statutory guidelines regarding the amount of money a party may be ordered to pay to support a child. The guidelines are based upon your monthly income and the number of children before the court. The guidelines also take into account a party’s legal obligation…

  • Aug 24, 2018
  • FAQ

Texas law does not require a parent to support his or her child beyond the age of 18 or graduation from high school, whichever occurs later. While parties may contractually agree that one party will pay for a child’s college tuition, the court is not authorized to order a party…